Category Archives: Uncategorized

Ikea Deal of the Year for Record Collectors

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We’re moving to a new house this year, and we were furniture shopping at the Ikea in Atlanta when I stumbled across these these little beauties… they’re called “Kallax.” Closeout sale, $16 each. Sorry, they’re probably all gone by the time you read this… Ikea seems to roll that way, as soon as I find a good record storage solution, they discontinue it. Anyway, each of these things have four cubes that are perfectly sized for albums.

They’re a good looking, solid build, and if you assemble them with glue, they’re a great solution for record collectors. Buy some while you can!

The only other mod for my record corner will be a piece of chair rail spaced out from the wall at about a half inch- to make a sort of “now playing” holder to display album cover artwork. More details to come.

New version of VinylStudio

I’ve been using a little program called VinylStudio for several years now. It makes the process of transferring vinyl records into my computer (and into my iTunes library) relatively easy. Since I have a new-ish Mac Mini that I use for my audio work, I updated my old version to version 8.8.2 and thought I’d post a review.

First disclosure, the software came to me courtesy of my wallet. It’s difficult (but not impossible) to write a truly unbiased review in exchange for a free thing-that-you’re reviewing. A pet peeve of mine is when reviewers don’t state up front who paid for the item, so I can take the review with one or two grains of salt.

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The main screen of VinylStudio. Here I’m working on a transfer for a client in Nashville called “A Christmas Delight” by Winifred Smith, cut in 1967… not likely to show up on iTunes anytime soon.

VinylStudio was designed to be a standalone program for getting your vinyl records onto your computer. At $30, its a fairly inexpensive, yet still pretty capable program. You can use it to burn CDs of your records if you like, or save the files in a number of different formats besides MP3s, including WAV, AAC (Advanced Audio Coding), AIFF (Audio Interchange File Format), ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec), DFF, DSF, (there are different types of Direct Stream Digital formats) FLAC Free Lossless Audio Codec), and OGG (Ogg Vorbis open-source format).

The program has a capable noise reduction section, but I use other programs for this job. It’s not because Vinyl Studio can’t do the job, it’s just that I’ve been using other programs for editing and noise reduction for years and I’m more familiar with them. Besides, they cost a pile of money so I’d rather use them than let them sit. I mainly use Adobe Soundbooth CS5 for editing and noise reduction, but for really difficult situations, I’ll use Izotope RX Pro.

While you can use VinylStudio to record the file directly into your computer, I record onto a Somy PCM10 recorder. The biggest reason is that my turntable is downstairs in the basement, and my audio workstation is in the office upstairs. I always clean the surface of the vinyl with a water-alcohol solution. (three parts distilled water, one part pure isopropryl alcohol, and one or two drops of Dawn dish detergent to break the surface tension. I usually make a gallon at a time). One of these days I’ll build an utrasonic/ centrifugal record cleaning machine. A somewhat risky way to clean really dirty albums is with a thin layer of Elmer’s glue. Once dry, it peels away from the vinyl, taking specks of dust and dirt with it. I’ve only done this experimentally though. Once recorded, I bring the PCM10 upstairs and download the file into my computer.

First I usually apply a rumble filter which greatly cleans up the waveform, then scan for really obnoxious pops and fix these individually. I’ll then declick the guard bands in between songs. But it’s rare that I’ll do further noise reduction… a certain amount of minor clicks and crackle is a part of the vinyl experience, and too much cleanup destroys the character. I’ll manually optimize the file and balance the tracks if necessary.

With that done, I then bring the file into Vinyl Studio for final work. This is where the program is a huge time-saver… dividing the file into individual songs, and looking through databases on the internet for the track names. This way, you are saved the work of typing in each track name individually. Sometimes it doesn’t work, like when the database can’t find a record, or more rarely, when there were several different versions of a record on vinyl or CD and the order of the songs has been rearranged. But more often than not, it works well. Then it’s a matter of trimming the breaks between the tracks to make the start and stop more accurate.

Another great advantage of the program is bringing the album into my iTunes library, which is a simple one-button affair. VERY handy.

Overall there aren’t a number of big changes with the program over the previous version, which is a relief. It’s a must-have if you’re new to vinyl. For me, it’s a super way to preserve my collection, which includes a small number of fairly expensive and hard-to-replace classics. For casual listening, I just hit the spacebar on my computer. It isn’t the same as cleaning the record and dropping the needle, but it’s really close. Vinyl has a finite number of times it can be played before it gets worn out, and this keeps your collection in nearly unplayed shape. Besides, it’s fun… and records can be traded or sold, which can’t be done with Spotify or iTunes. Buy yourself a turntable, a preamp, some old records, and this program and give it a try… it’ll change the way you enjoy music!

Fat Hair commercial

Another commercial that I did awhile back in Atlanta. Admittedly not much audio made it to the final cut, but trust me, it’s there!

Bonnaroo’s “Festie Besties”

Here’s a video that I worked on for RedBull Media in 2015. It features Manon Mathews and Bree Esserig, a pair of very smart, funny young actresses. They’re already semi-famous… they were stopped for photos a number of times… but I’m sure they’ll go far.

 

Claire Lynch coming to Chattanooga Sept 9th

I first met Claire Lynch when she was the lead vocalist for the Front Porch String Band, when I recorded the band on location for an undergraduate project. This would have been around 1981. (Unfortunately, the tapes were lost long ago.) Jump ahead 35 years, Claire has her own band and has won the IBMA’s Best Female Vocalist Award… twice… so it goes without saying that she’s a pretty amazing singer and songwriter. (Don’t take my word for it… listen to one of her songs.) And she’s coming to Barking Legs in Chattanooga, 8pm this Friday night. Claire’s website is here.

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Barking legs is a SUPER venue for this concert. If you’ve never been there, it’s a small performance space. The most it’ll hold is maybe 150-175 people, and the furthest seat back is 4 rows away. The only way you’ll get a better seat is to have her play at your house.

I normally try to do a location recording when she comes to town, but won’t get the chance this time… I’m in the middle of a 3-day shoot for TLC. I should be able to just make the concert, though.

She doesn’t play here very often, so if you’re into progressive bluegrass at all, don’t miss this chance to hear her play– show starts at 8pm. Tickets are $21 in advance, available on the Barking Legs website (shortcut)

Mixbus 3.4 In Action

As I’ve said before, Harrison’s Mixbus is my DAW of choice. Sure, I’ve used ProTools like everybody else. And it works fine, but I don’t exactly love it for a number of reasons. I discovered Mixbus at a Nashville AES event, and was an immediate fan & early adopter. It’s been through a number of versions, the most recent being Mixbus 3.4. I used it to mix a recent live music project. Here’s the workflow:

Since I don’t have a studio anymore, I rarely use Mixbus for tracking. Instead I like to use a dedicated recorder. First choice would be an Otari MX80 or MTR90 2″ 24-track, but I haven’t had access to one of those in a long time… and at about 350 pounds, it isn’t exactly practical for location work. So instead, I used my Sound Devices 664. It can record up to 12 channels, but I did this recording before I got my new CL-12 controller, so six channels is easier… six faders and six XLR inputs. As this was a three-person band, six tracks would work. Track assignments on most tracks were three vocals, bass, kick, and accordion. There were other instruments as well– most notably percussion consisting of a washboard played with toilet brushes and a tambourine that was played by Rachel’s left foot while her right foot played the kick– but these were picked up with the main vocal mic, the Watts Polyribbon , as well as the instrument mics. The other two mics were headworn earwires via a Lectrosonics wireless. Most of my instrument mics were handbuilt large-diaphragm condensers, except for the mandolin and guitar, when I brought out my Oktavia 012.

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“Spinsters” location recording session in a burned-out house, summer 2016 in Chattanooga, TN

The final output will be a music video, but it was to be shot in one continuous take. So everything needed to be captured live… no overdubs or punch-ins, just individual track sweetening and mixing. We recorded in a burned-out house, which gave an interesting room sound. It was kind of reflective, but not in the usual sense. No soft surfaces anywhere, since most of them burned, but there were lots of irregular surfaces to break up standing waves. A fairly short reverb time, not a huge space, but nice high ceilings. Hard to describe, other than to say it was an interesting, nice space.

Once the capture was complete, I brought it home to mix. My preference is to do all the editing in the box, then use a multi channel interface to output the individual tracks to my rebuilt Soundcraft 800. But again the practicalities of space and weight rear their heads… the mixer is up in Nashville and all my other gear is in storage, so for simplicity’s sake I’ll mix this on my desktop. My audio computer consists of a Mac Mini with a 3TB thunderbolt external drive for the audio. I have a Universal Audio Apollo Twin interface that I use as a monitor controller and a dongle for my UA plugins (you have to have some kind of Universal Audio hardware connected in order to get the plugins to work.) UA plugins are somewhat expensive, but they work well and are far cheaper than their hardware equivalents… I like them a lot. My main reverb is the EMT140 plate, though I’ve got the Lexicon 224 plugin on my watchlist… I’m waiting for a good sale!

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The mixbus screenshot for “mule.” This one was a pretty simple mix since there are only four tracks… two vocals, guitar and bass.

The reason I’m such a Mixbus fan is that it looks and feels like an analog mixer. Each input channel has a full EQ section and an onboard compressor, just as Harrison’s analog mixers had. I can import individual WAV files from the 664 and it opens up an 8 channel mix surface in Mixbus. (Update: Just this morning I purchased Harrison’s new Mixbus 32C, which is their newest version of Mixbus. It functions in a similar manner to the standard Mixbus, but features an exact emulation of the Harrison X32 console, with expanded EQ, filtering, and compression options. Watch for a review once I’ve had a chance to thouroughly test it out.)

“Mule” was a pretty simple song to mix, as there were only two vocal mics (my handbuilt LDCs), a guitar mic (Oktavia 012), and an upright bass (Watts Polyribbon), The first two tracks in the screenshot are muted– these are the field mixes from the 664, not used in the final mix. Rachel Vox is a harmony track, Amelia sings lead on this song. I added a little brightness to her vocal and guitar using Harrison’s EQ, then smoothed out the levels a bit with some compression. The only plugin I used was the EMT140 plate, which I tried not to overdo… remember, this is for video, and it might look weird to have lots of post effects in the mix. But this is a slow ballad, so I felt it needed little more ‘verb than the other songs.

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Izotope RX5 Advanced screenshot. While some of these tools are available as plugins, I bought the standalone version, which has more capabilities. I’m hooked on the de-noise and de-plosive modules, which fixed problems that were unfixable in the past.

This song has some quiet passages, and noise from outside the house was more noticeable. Windows were broken in the fire, the house is on a fairly busy street, and nearby AC units all added together to give us more background noise than I’d have liked. RX5 Advanced is the answer to this problem, so I exported the mix as a FLAC and opened this in RX5.

I bought this program for noise reduction and sweetening of voice narration, but it works great in this application as well. I used the spectral de-noise module to learn a short sample of the ambient noise at the end of the track, and applied this profile to the entire song. It worked like a charm. Every time I use this program, I’m amazed at the results. It has lots of other functions and capabilities, but I left most of this alone, as I didn’t want to overprocess the song. I exported this as a WAV file.

To finalize the track, I opened it in Adobe Soundbooth CS5. Adobe abandoned this program when they went to CS6, but I’ve always found it great to use, especially for cleanup, editing, etc. I trimmed the head and the tail, added fade in and fade out, and saved as an MP3 (which Izotope can’t do). Job done… here’s the audio track:

I’ll post the video as soon as it becomes available.

 

Reel: Delta Airlines

Here’s another piece that I recently worked on for Delta Airlines with Seftel/Smartypants Pictures. Location audio by Atlanta mixer  Jay Ticer and myself.

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